Bizfield Angel Network Ltd.

 

One-stop service provider for

• Entrepreneurship

• Listing

• Investment

between Canada and China

Location:

201-4501 Kingsway,

Burnaby,

BC  V5H 0E5

Quick link:

Contact us:

Email: info@bizfieldangel.com

© 2018 by BizField Angel Network Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Listing Costs

 

 

Initial costs

Actual costs vary depending on the nature and complexity of a transaction, but the following ranges may be helpful as a general guide:

Other fees to consider include:

  • Securities commission fees 

  • Transfer agency fees 

  • Geological or engineering reports 

  • Valuation reports 

  • Investor relations costs 

  • Printing and translation costs 

  • Director and Officer liability insurance

 

Ongoing expenses

 

Companies should also plan for ongoing expenses related to their listing:

  • Cost of fulfilling the securities commissions filing requirements

  • Sustaining fees and additional listing fees of the Exchange 

  • Legal, accounting, printing and possibly translation costs required to file periodic, quarterly and annual reports

 

In addition, executives will need to channel significant time away from their regular duties to oversee the preparation of these filings, and the CEO and the CFO will need to certify the accuracy of the financial statements. The company will also need to ensure the efficiency of its internal controls, which may require additional hiring or outsourcing.

Costs of Going Public on TSX

 

 

Exchange Fees

Original Listing Fees for TSX range between $10,000 and $200,000, and is determined by the market value of the company at the point of listing. A non-refundable deposit of $10,000 must be submitted at the time of the application.

During the life of a listing, there will be additional fees for certain transactions such as property acquisitions, public offerings and private placements. As well, there will be an annual sustaining fee payable after the first year of the listing.

Securities Commission Fees

Securities commissions will charge an administrative fee for a prospectus filing, as well as for additional filings. Fees vary by province, so please check with your local securities commission or your legal counsel for specifics.

There will also be an additional brokerage fee, calculated based on a percentage of gross proceeds, payable to the underwriter who handles your prospectus filing.

Sponsorship Fees

The sponsorship fee is a third-party cost, payable to a recognized Participating Organization or Member to conduct a due diligence study ensuring that your company meets Exchange listing requirements. Sponsorship will be required if the business involves unproven or unique technology, regardless of sector, or has foreign business assets.

Fees for an initial public offering, reverse takeover or qualifying transaction can range from $15,000 to $50,000, although costs may be higher depending on the level of due diligence required. For example, more due diligence would be required for a company with foreign business assets.

 

Investment dealer fees

The investment dealer who will be selling your company's securities into the marketplace will charge a negotiable sales commission ranging from 6%-10% of the value of the securities sold plus a warrant. This sales commission will be paid out of the offering proceeds.

The investment dealer may also charge a corporate finance fee, although this is usually combined with the sponsorship fees listed above.

Professional fees

Audit costs vary depending on the complexity of your company, the state of its accounting records, and its financial position. The cost of auditing an operating company for the first time may range between $12,000 and $80,000, although may be higher if a company has foreign operations. There may also be costs for additional services, such as comfort letters.

Legal fees for a Canadian company listing on the Exchange generally range from $400,000 to $750,000. As well, foreign companies and certain types of businesses (e.g. business trusts) may incur higher legal fees.

Legal counsel must conduct due diligence to help management ensure there is full, true and plain disclosure to the public of all material facts about the company. Legal costs associated with going public will vary depending on the quality and quantity of documents prepared by the company and the complexity of the business.

Costs of maintaining a public company

Once your company is listed, you can expect to incur additional legal and accounting fees on an annual basis that are over and above what you incurred as a private company. This is a result of the additional reporting requirements that are incurred as a result of a public listing, as well as the cost of complying with corporate governance standards.

Your legal and investor relations fees may also be higher if you need help to meet your company's continuous disclosure requirements, including quarterly financial statements or news releases.

TSXV Costs

Exchange Fees

Original Listing Fees for TSXV range between $10,000 and $40,000, with a sustaining fee payable after the first month. There are also additional fees for certain transactions, such as property acquisitions, secondary public offerings and private placements.

Securities Commission Fees

Securities commissions will charge an administrative fee for a prospectus filing, as well as for additional filings. Fees vary by province, so please check with your local securities commission or your legal counsel for specifics.

There will also be an additional brokerage fee, calculated based on a percentage of gross proceeds, payable to the underwriter who handles your prospectus filing.

Sponsorship Fees

The sponsorship fee is a third-party cost, payable to a recognized Participating Organization or Member to conduct a due diligence study ensuring that your company meets Exchange listing requirements. Sponsorship will be required if the business involves unproven or unique technology, regardless of sector, or has foreign business assets.

Fees for an initial public offering, reverse takeover or qualifying transaction can range from $15,000 to $50,000, although costs may be higher depending on the level of due diligence required. For example, more due diligence would be required for a company with foreign business assets.

For a Capital Pool Company, sponsorship fees range between $8,000 and $12,000.

 

Investment dealer fees

The investment dealer who will be selling your company's securities into the marketplace will charge a negotiable sales commission ranging from 6%-10% of the value of the securities sold plus a warrant. This sales commission will be paid out of the offering proceeds.

The investment dealer may also charge a corporate finance fee, although this is usually combined with the sponsorship fees listed above.

 

Professional fees

Audit costs vary depending on the complexity of your company, the state of its accounting records, and its financial position. The cost of auditing an operating company for the first time may range between $12,000 and $80,000, although may be higher if a company has foreign operations. There may also be costs for additional services, such as comfort letters.

Legal fees for a Canadian company listing on the Exchange generally range from $50,000 to $100,000. As well, foreign companies and certain types of businesses (e.g. business trusts) may incur higher legal fees.

Legal counsel must conduct due diligence to help management ensure there is full, true and plain disclosure to the public of all material facts about the company. Legal costs associated with going public will vary depending on the quality and quantity of documents prepared by the company and the complexity of the business.

 

Costs of maintaining a public company

Once your company is listed, you can expect to incur additional legal and accounting fees on an annual basis that are over and above what you incurred as a private company. This is a result of the additional reporting requirements that are incurred as a result of a public listing, as well as the cost of complying with corporate governance standards.

Your legal and investor relations fees may also be higher if you need help to meet your company's continuous disclosure requirements, including quarterly financial statements or news releases.

***information all from www.tsx.com

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